Why I Do This

 

Back in the ‘80s, I worked for an insurance company with about 400 coworkers. While there, I completed my MBA and passed the CPA exam. These achievements led coworkers to seek me out for financial advice. I liked helping them, which led me into financial planning.

 

When I left the security of a steady paycheck for the opportunity to chart my own course, I was realistic about what I would earn. I expected no net income in the first year and figured it would take five years before I was back to my previous income. I beat those expectations, but only slightly.

 

I was motivated into financial planning for the right reason – to help people build a solid financial future. I didn’t get into it for the money. Money is the effect of our work; it should never be the cause. When money becomes the cause of our work, money will inevitably corrupt that work. Ironically, this work of financial planning is too important to allow money to become a distraction.

 

I’m a Missionary, not a Mercenary. I see what I do as a mission first, a profession second, and a job third. When someone asks for help, I’ll do what I can. The compensation will work itself out.

 

That said, after almost three decades doing this, I make a very nice living. And the joy of helping people is still there. It’s why I hope to never retire.

 

Mark DiGiovanni, CFP

Check the background of this financial professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck
Check the background of this financial professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck